Sunday, May 24, 2020

Fun with Taika Waititi and friends - reading of Jack and The Giant Peach EP3


Eddie Redmayne joined Taika Waititi, Cate Blanchett, Sarah Paulson,
Kumail Nanjiani, and Ruth Wilson to read Chapters 9 – 13 of James
and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl in support of Partners In Health.



Eddie reads the role of Ms. Ladybird.





















New episodes released every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
at 6pm BST / 1pm EST / 10 PST.


Saturday, May 23, 2020

Rewatched The Other Boleyn Girl

Recently rewatched the movie on Prime Video. I didn't post much about
this film yet, so I decided to make a few gifs. Here's the first part.





There are so many amazing actors in this period drama. Mark Rylance, 
Kristin Scott Thomas, Nathalie Portman, Scarlett Johansson, Jim Sturgess,
Eric Bana, Benedict Cumberbatch, David Morrissey, and so on. (IMDB)




"...at the audition for The Other Boleyn Girl, they were like, “So Eddie, one last thing:
How’s your horse riding?” And I said, “Well, there’s a little story I should probably
tell you.” [Bailey laughs] And so they sent me off on a two-month training camp, and
I literally learned to horse ride. I basically did the whole thing in order to suppress
all my doubters." - Eddie Redmayne (Interview Magazine March 2008)






Mark Rylance portrays Sir Thomas Boleyn. He also worked with Eddie
in theater in 2002, he played Olivia in 'Twelfth Night', and I can't wait
to see them in their new film 'The Trial of the Chicago 7'. Eddie plays
Tom Hayden, Mark Rylance portrays defense lawyer William Kunstler.

Related posts:

More:

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

New video - AFI Movie Club pick by Eddie


American Film Institute posted a video on social media with this caption:
“Today’s AFI Movie Club pick is one of the greatest epic films of all time
and we’re so happy to have an epic actor tell you all about it.”


Eddie Redmayne introduces the film REDS for AFI Movie Club
You can read more about it on broadwayworld.com here


"It was co-written, directed, and produced by Warren Beatty. It's an extraordinary vast
movie, one of the last films ever to have an intermission, but this epic has at its core
this really intricate, very beautiful love story. The performances are mind-blowing.
of course Warren Beatty. I'd sure to listen of for its score, which is partly written by
Stephen Sondheim. It's just beautiful. Anyway, you can go to afi.com to find more.
If you haven't seen the movie I hope you enjoy it and keep yourself safe. Bye.”
- Eddie Redmayne


Do you see the picture on the wall behind him? - Is this a painting by
Einar Wegener (Lili Elbe), whom Eddie played in The Danish Girl?


"Redmayne won't be nabbing any artwork from the production for himself, especially
if it's of himself. "I think it'd be a bit surreal to have paintings of me in Lili guise,"
says the Oscar winner. Instead, he'd prefer an original Einar landscape, which
surrounded him while shooting at The Royal Opera House in Copenhagen.
"Rather than being in a trailer, I was in a room by the Opera and the production
team has found some of Lili's paintings, from when she was living as Einar, that
were on my wall. It was amazing to have that as inspiration," says Redmayne.
Also on his wish list: "I'd love to own some of Gerda's real paintings of Lili, but
I think I'm probably behind the times! I should have invested early!"" (source: THR)

I wonder if it's one of those pictures, and Eddie bought it after the filming.
Or maybe Eddie painted it himself? Maybe he will tell us someday. 
" I did some drawings and a wee bit of painting to try to get what Einar’s, or
Lili when she was living as Einar, what her technique was." - he answered
to my question during The Danish Girl promo in 2015.

There's another interesting object behind Eddie on the left. 
I think it's an artwork by Esna Su. You find my related post here.

Sunday, May 17, 2020

#GetMNDonTheList campaign

As a patron of the MND Association, Eddie Redmayne has joined supporters &
clinicians to ask Matt Hancock & Department of Health and Social Care to get
MND on the list of ‘extremely vulnerable’ persons from Covid-19. 👏 


Eddie said: “The only sure way of keeping everyone with MND safe is to give
them access to the vital assistance that the 'extremely clinically vulnerable’ list
affords them. I am sure that these are complicated decisions for the Government
to make during this difficult time but it is astonishing to me that those living with
motor neurone disease have not been automatically included on the 'extremely
clinically vulnerable’ list.”

The latest news about the #GetMNDonTheList campaign are here


The photo was taken at the
Source: @mndVIPteam

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Eddie reads chapter 3 from the first Harry Potter book


Eddie Redmayne reads the third chapter, ‘The Letters from No One’ from Harry
Potter and the Philosopher’s/Sorcerer’s Stone, as part of Harry Potter At Home. 
Eddie narrates the Dursleys’ desperate attempts to escape the mysterious letters
addressed to Mr. H Potter. But will Harry ever get to read one?








Friday, May 8, 2020

Harry Potter at home sneak peek video



Some of the most famous faces from global entertainment, music, and sport have lent
their voices to their beloved story by recording videos of themselves reading the first
Harry Potter book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone/Sorcerer’s Stone.



Eddie Redmayne, Daniel Radcliffe, Stephen Fry, David Beckham, Dakota Fanning, Claudia
Kim, Noma Dumezweni, and more are amongst the cast of narrators, each will be reading
different sections, all 17 chapters of this iconic book over the coming weeks.
 



Daniel Radcliffe has read the whole of Chapter One of Harry Potter and
the Philosopher’s Stone/Sorcerer’s Stone, ‘The Boy Who Lived’,
While you can watch Daniel’s reading right here, you can also listen
in audio form thanks to Spotify, who will be hosting all of the readings


I can't wait to watch and listen to Eddie's reading. He already
read his  favorite passage from the book during The Crimes
of Grindelwald promo in 2018, which was music to my ears.



(The pictures are my screenshots of Eddie in the embedded video.)

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Eddie as a kid - early years


When Eddie was asked in an interview for Evening Standard about his first London
memory he said: "Being pushed in my pram by my mum across Albert Bridge when
I was three. It was pouring with rain but I was so cosy and I remember looking up
and seeing my mum's face drenched with rain."

 Baby Eddie images source: CBS Sunday Morning interview

Born (6th January 1982) to a banker and a business owner Eddie Redmayne
grew up in a large house on the Chelsea Embankment in London.
Eddie's mother Patricia is a stylish woman, always interested in fashion, and
friends recall seeing her shopping in the leading couture house Catherine Walker
accompanied by the young Eddie. She loved to dress him up too and he would
often be seen wearing a sailor suit...

Eddie spent his childhood holidays in his family's farmhouse in Grimaud France
close to St. Tropez and just two hours from the ski slopes. The villa boasts a
12-meter swimming pool and tennis court, surrounded by forests and the views
from the house stretch over its own vineyard into the Prignon Valley. (x)

His parents encouraged Eddie's talent: they sent him to drama lessons and
while still very young, he turned out to be an extremely gifted singer...
'He's a performer and has been ever since he was five and first started singing
at school' his mother once said. Eddie went to the best schools in Britain.
Before Eton, he attended Eton House then won a choral scholarship to
Colet Court a preparatory school for boys aged seven to thirteen.
(Read more in Eddie Redmayne - The Biography by Emily Herbert)


"I kind of enjoyed singing... My parents aren't like theatrical or musical really, but
very supportive... I had some lessons when I was a kid." - DP/30 Les Mis interview

Did you know that Eddie's first TV appearance was much earlier than his role
in Animal Ark, even earlier than his West End debut in 'Oliver'? He appeared
in Wide Awake Club, a children's TV program at age 8 singing in the shower.
Timmy Mallett presenter posted about it on Twitter.

I was asked in a comment about Eddie's pets. Eddie is very tight-lipped
if it comes to his childhood and private life. I know only a few things he
revealed in his interviews. Here's what I read in a Mirror article:
Eddie keeps his distance from most animals – because there’s nothing magic
about the rash that appears out of nowhere if he gets too close... “I had a dog
when I was younger but I am deeply allergic to cats and to horses and things,”



"When I was a kid ... my mom and dad, because I had an interest were taking me to
the theatre and one of the first things I saw was the Midsummer Night's Dream at
the National Theatre and Tim (Timothy Spall) was playing Bottom. And it was all
set in mud and there was a contortionist playing Puck, this woman, and when the
ears came onto Bottom, this contortionist got up on Tim's shoulders and her feet
were the ears and I remember afterward we went on a tour behind and that is when
I got sold on like on genuinely of the magic of it..." - THR Roundtable video

Eddie's other defining theatre experience then was when his parents took him
to see Les Mis. He loved it, and he wanted to be Gavroche. When he heard about
the movie project he wanted to be a part of it and the audition process begun.


Eddie on his favorite birthday: "I was really into magic when I was a kid, and there's
this amazing place in Charing Cross in London called Davenports which is like a proper
magicians shop, a shop where you can go and buy like a box to chop people in half ...
And I was used to sort-of go and stand in the windows regularly. And one year I think
I must've been about sort of 9 or 10 my mun got a guy called Nick Davenport I think his
name was. I remember his business card, he did that (demonstrating) on it, and he came
and did a magic show and I thought that was kind of amazing and that was a goodie."

In an interview for Out magazine, Eddie stumbles to recall whether there were
traditional male and female roles prescribed in the house in which he grew up.
“I suppose it depends on what you think of as masculine and feminine.
I was musical, and I was into theater and arts, but I was also into sports,
so I had quite a broad spectrum. I can also totally see that other people
see femininity in me.” He has been aware of this perception before, in
life as in work. He is not a butch man. “No. No, no, no, absolutely not.”

That's what I found about his early years. I cannot recall more now.